Tuesday, December 15, 2009

How to Make a Fluffernutter


Christy
Yates, associate director for Gordon in Lynn (GIL), with a special how-to guide for Notes Along the Way.


One of our philosophies with Gordon in Lynn, an urban service-learning partnership between Gordon and Lynn, is that you need to get to know the city in which you live and minister. GIL’s director, Val Buchanan, and I both live in Lynn and have come to know and love many aspects about this city from the beautiful ocean front to the diverse cultures (and their corresponding eateries), to the vast Lynn woods. We’ve also gotten to know a little of Lynn’s history.
Lynn is known as the city of firsts—including the first female model, Lydia Pinkham, who used her image to sell apothecary products and the nation’s first jet airplane engine, which was built at Lynn’s General Electric plant in 1942. But most don’t know that Fluff was also first produced in Lynn! It is believed that a Somerville man invented the gooey white stuff in 1917 and then sold the recipe to two young entrepreneurs, Durkee and Mower, whose business savvy and creativity allowed
Fluff to become a bonafide food product beyond our Massachusetts borders.
While we don’t send Gordon students to the factory for service-learning opportunities (maybe someday?), we do enjoy spreading the Fluff love. To that end, relive some childhood memories with this how-to guide.

How to make a Fluffernutter:
Step One: Spread 2 tablespoons of Marshmallow Fluff on a slice of Wonder bread.
Step Two: Spread 2 tablespoons of peanut butter (preferably Skippy Smooth) on another piece of white bread.
Step Three: Stick together and enjoy!

No time to make your own? Just head to the Lane Student Center, where this New England staple is always on the menu.

In addition to her flair for Fluff, Christy Yates is especially passionate about the intersection of faith, the arts, and sustainable community development. During seminary her final thesis involved writing a business plan for her church's drop-in pottery studio—now a viable social enterprise.

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