Sunday, March 30, 2008

Update!

If you missed Jennifer Hevelone-Harper’s talk on Prime Time America last week, you can listen to it here.
Jennifer is author of Disciples of the Desert (Oxford University Press, 2006) and associate professor of history at Gordon. She recently published the article “Tracing the Footsteps of Jesus” in Christian History and Biography: The Holy Land: issue 97.

Read More...

Friday, March 28, 2008

Confessions of a Small-Business Fanatic

“It started with flowers. Roses really, the color of cherry tomatoes, delivered fresh from the truck to living rooms or offices throughout my neighborhood. Veld Kamp Florist had been around, it seemed, since forever, and my mom always called them whenever we had to go to a funeral or an anniversary party.” Read more of Jo Kadlecek's article in the online journal of the Trinity Forum, Provocations.

Kadlecek, assistant professor of communications at Gordon, is the author of numerous books, including The Lightfoot Trilogy and Desperate Women of the Bible. Provocations is edited by Dan Russ, director of the Center for Christian Studies at Gordon.

Read More...

Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Tracing the Footsteps of Jesus

Jennifer Hevelone-Harper ’92, associate professor of history, has recently published “Tracing the Footsteps of Jesus” in Christian History and Biography: The Holy Land: issue 97.

She tells the story of Egeria, a fourth-century pilgrim whose account of her journey to the Holy Land is “unusual for its time because a woman wrote it, but her activities were not out of the ordinary.” Like other pilgrims, Egeria was “motivated by a desire to see the places where Jesus lived, to visit the sites associated with the Old Testament patriarchs and prophets, and to meet holy men and women practicing monasticism.” Read more...

Hevelone-Harper will be interviewed by Prime Time America Thursday, March 27, at 6:30 p.m. You may listen to the program here.

Read More...

The Oxymoron of Proximate Justice

Recently Comment magazine, the online journal of the Work Research Foundation, approached “a small group of readers who are pursuing vocations in politics and justice, and asked them to grapple with the concept of proximate justice in their respective lines of work.” Among the authors was Christen Yates, associate director of the Gordon in Lynn program.

Christen writes: “Proximate justice is an uncomfortable oxymoron at first. Isn’t justice, by its very nature, meant to be full and absolute, right or wrong? Doesn’t the integrity of the term demand our full commitment, our faith in the possibility of real justice?” Read more...
Eden Garber '01 was also a contributor. She writes: “I am entering the field of health care now as a grad student in nursing. It is an area where, at the individual and community levels, I can accept that some movement in the direction of health is better than no movement.” Read more...

Read More...

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Borgman's blogging

On publication of his third book on biblical narrative, Paul Borgman, professor of English, has started a blog containing descriptions and reviews of his work. Of his foray into this brave new world of online communication, he offers this disclaimer:
“I’m not using this blog in the ordinary sense of ‘journaling’ with others. It’s functioning as a poor man’s website.” Check it out here...

Read More...

Easter in Baja

In my inbox this morning from Martha Stout, staff writer. She and her husband, math professor Dick Stout, went to Mexico over spring break:
“We’re just back from Baja—what a wonderful trip!!! Blue whales in the Sea of Cortez. Gray whales that came to us in the Laguna San Ignacio on the Pacific side. Lots in between, including Holy Week services at the Loreto Mission of Nuestra Senora, the first Spanish mission on the peninsula. A Good Friday procession complete with Roman centurions on horseback, Jesus carrying his cross, followed by Mexicans dressed as his followers, and many ordinary folk—mostly Mexicans but a scattering of gringos like ourselves, numerous babies in arms and in strollers, and quite a few dogs.
“Christo ha resucitado! En verdad, esta resucitado!”

Read More...